Education, Teaching & Design

SADAKO AND THE 1000 PAPER CRANES

Added on by leigh mckolay.

ART/ SOCIAL STUDIES LESSON ADAPTIVE

Supplies Origami folding Instructions Origami Paper Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes By: Eleanor Coerr   Goals, Objectives, benefits- WHY? Sadako Sasaki was 2 years old when the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima. She lived close to the site and would later die from radiation poisoning at the age of 12. Sadako believed that if she folded 1000 origami cranes, she wouldn’t die. (You see, the story of the crane is important in Japanese culture- symbolizing loyalty, grace and beauty and it is thought that if one were to fold 1000 cranes the person will be granted their greatest wish). Sadako’s story has found it’s way around the globe- acting as a call to end such horrors. Currently children from all over the world fold and send cranes to be strung on the Sadako memorial in Hiroshima. There are multi disciplinary possibilities in teaching this to middle range aged children (5th grade). The subject matter is dark yes- but I believe that the culture of violence children are exposed to - or rather immersed in often times has no face- and the idea of consequence or empathy is lost. The original plan was meant for middle school children but I believe it to be an effective teaching tool for upper elementary as well. This lesson integrates art, social studies, history…. and teaches leadership- as the children will emerge as teachers themselves in the folding process.   Steps  1. Introduce the story of Sadako to the students (read- Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes By: Eleanor Coerr ) -  This will give students some time to connect with the information and gather the student’s attention. -Show class photos of memorial with cranes. 2. Couple this reading with a brief history lesson- detailing location of Hiroshima (could even later tie in continued lessons on country study- culture, landscape). 3. Give class instruction on folding origami crane. Practice the folds, allowing for children to assist each other. 4. Once the children feel confident, use origami paper for final folding.       Estimated Time 60 minute multiple sessions (2).   Elements and Principles of Design   Form- The length width and depth of the paper will be explored as it is transformed into a same-but new creation. Pattern- The arrangement of form will be focused upon as students explore the various folding pattern it takes to create the crane.   Common Curriculum Goals Students will understand and apply media, techniques and processes Describe an artwork to serve a function. Compare and contrast different functions of art in various environments using targeted vocabulary. Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of tools and materials used to create a work of art. Students will understand the visual arts in relation to history and cultures. Recognize connections between historical events and art development. Research connections between art, cultures, and history.   Assessment Evaluation Part of the lesson is that the classroom when finished with their lesson will teach the rest of the school. Previous experience with this lesson has shown a class-wide enthusiasm for the project and school wide participation. The enthusiasm of the students seems to be proof of learning.   Interdisciplinary Connections This subject connects to art, history, social studies and geography.   Related Resources Oregon Art Standards http://www.tn.gov/education/ci/arts/visualart5.shtml Sadako Sasaki http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sadako_Sasaki      

Supplies

Origami folding Instructions

Origami Paper

Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes By: Eleanor Coerr

 

Goals, Objectives, benefits- WHY?

Sadako Sasaki was 2 years old when the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima. She lived close to the site and would later die from radiation poisoning at the age of 12.

Sadako believed that if she folded 1000 origami cranes, she wouldn’t die. (You see, the story of the crane is important in Japanese culture- symbolizing loyalty, grace and beauty and it is thought that if one were to fold 1000 cranes the person will be granted their greatest wish).

Sadako’s story has found it’s way around the globe- acting as a call to end such horrors. Currently children from all over the world fold and send cranes to be strung on the Sadako memorial in Hiroshima.

There are multi disciplinary possibilities in teaching this to middle range aged children (5th grade). The subject matter is dark yes- but I believe that the culture of violence children are exposed to - or rather immersed in often times has no face- and the idea of consequence or empathy is lost. The original plan was meant for middle school children but I believe it to be an effective teaching tool for upper elementary as well.

This lesson integrates art, social studies, history…. and teaches leadership- as the children will emerge as teachers themselves in the folding process.

 

Steps

 1. Introduce the story of Sadako to the students (read- Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes By: Eleanor Coerr )

-  This will give students some time to connect with the information and gather the student’s attention.

-Show class photos of memorial with cranes.

2. Couple this reading with a brief history lesson- detailing location of Hiroshima (could even later tie in continued lessons on country study- culture, landscape).

3. Give class instruction on folding origami crane. Practice the folds, allowing for children to assist each other.

4. Once the children feel confident, use origami paper for final folding.

 

 

 

Estimated Time

60 minute multiple sessions (2).

 

Elements and Principles of Design

 

Form- The length width and depth of the paper will be explored as it is transformed into a same-but new creation.

Pattern- The arrangement of form will be focused upon as students explore the various folding pattern it takes to create the crane.

 

Common Curriculum Goals

Students will understand and apply media, techniques and processes

Describe an artwork to serve a function.

Compare and contrast different functions of art in various environments using targeted vocabulary.

Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of tools and materials used to create a work of art.

Students will understand the visual arts in relation to history and cultures.

Recognize connections between historical events and art development.

Research connections between art, cultures, and history.

 

Assessment Evaluation

Part of the lesson is that the classroom when finished with their lesson will teach the rest of the school. Previous experience with this lesson has shown a class-wide enthusiasm for the project and school wide participation. The enthusiasm of the students seems to be proof of learning.

 

Interdisciplinary Connections

This subject connects to art, history, social studies and geography.

 

Related Resources

Oregon Art Standards http://www.tn.gov/education/ci/arts/visualart5.shtml

Sadako Sasaki

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sadako_Sasaki